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2014  
by Minas Kastanakis and George Balabanis
This article examines the impact of various individual differences on consumers' propensity to engage in two distinct forms of conspicuous (publicly observable) luxury consumption behavior. Status seeking is an established driver, but other managerially relevant drivers can also explain conspicuous consumption of luxuries. The study develops and empirically confirms a conceptual model that shows that bandwagon and snobbish buying patterns underlie the more generic conspicuous consumption of luxuries.
by Andreas Chatzidakis, Minas Kastanakis, and Anastasia Stathopoulou
Despite the reasonable explanatory power of existing models of consumers’ ethical decision making, a large part of the process remains unexplained. This article draws on previous research and proposes an integrated model that includes measures of the theory of planned behavior, personal norms, self-identity, neutralization, past experience, and attitudinal ambivalence.
by Tom van Laer, Ko de Ruyter, Luca Visconti, and Martin Wetzels
Stories, and their ability to transport their audience, constitute a central part of human life and consumption experience. Integrating previous literature derived from fields as diverse as anthropology, marketing, psychology, communication, consumer, and literary studies, this article offers a review of two decades worth of research on narrative transportation, the phenomenon in which consumers mentally enter a world that a story evokes. Despite the relevance of narrative transportation for storytelling and narrative persuasion, extant contributions seem to lack systematization. The authors conceive the extended transportation-imagery model, which provides not only a comprehensive model that includes the antecedents and consequences of narrative transportation but also a multidisciplinary framework in which cognitive psychology and consumer culture theory cross-fertilize this field of inquiry. The authors test the model using a quantitative metaanalysis of 132 effect sizes of narrative transportation from 76 published and unpublished articles and identify fruitful directions for further research.
by Minas Kastanakis and Benjamin G. Voyer
Researchers are increasingly recognizing the role of culture as a source of variation in many phenomena of central importance to consumer research. This review addresses a gap in cross-cultural consumer behavior literature by providing a review and conceptual analysis of the effects of culture on pre-behavioral processes (perception and cognition).
2012  
by Minas N. Kastanakis and George Balabanis
This paper examines the impact of a number of psychological factors on consumers' propensity to engage in the “bandwagon” type of luxury consumption. It develops and empirically confirms a conceptual model of bandwagon consumption of luxury products.
by Alain Samson and Benjamin G. Voyer
Dual system and dual process views of the human mind have contrasted automatic, fast, and non-conscious with controlled, slow, and conscious thinking. This paper integrates duality models from the perspective of consumer psychology by identifying three relevant theoretical strands: Persuasion and attitude change (e.g. Elaboration Likelihood Model), judgment and decision making (e.g. Intuitive vs. Reflective Model), as well as buying and consumption behavior (e.g. Reflective-Impulsive Model).
2009  
by Chris Halliburton and Agnes Ziegfeld
The article analyses how major European multinationals communicate their corporate identity across countries via their corporate websites. It examines the approach of the top 100 European listed companies which have a corporate website with head offices in the UK, France or Germany by comparing their home ("parent") website with the host websites in the other two countries using a content analysis approach.
2005  
by Chris Halliburton and Reinhard Hünerbergb
The article analyses how major European multinationals communicate their corporate identity across countries via their corporate websites. It examines the approach of the top 100 European listed companies which have a corporate website with head offices in the UK, France or Germany by comparing their home ("parent") website with the host websites in the other two countries using a content analysis approach.
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