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Posted by Ben Voyer at 12:59 - 0 Comments
Has the good old questionnaire had its days? Research is increasingly relying on new technologies to improve our understanding of the marketplace. In quantitative research, one of the most interesting fields of research of the last twenty years is undoubtedly the Implicit Attitude Test (IAT). The implicit attitude test addresses one of the main weaknesses of traditional self-reported attitudes (e.g. ‘how do you feel about Brand X?’): the fact that these attitudes can be ‘tainted’ by social desirability (i.e. the propensity that we all have to a certain extent to conform to normative opinions). Say for instance that you want to study the implicit attitudes (i.e. hidden preferences) that affect two car brands: Mercedes and Opel. What the implicit attitude test allows you to do is to see how fast consumers can categorise words or images that relate to Mercedes (vs Opel) with a list of good (vs bad) words or images. In other words, the implicit attitude test relies on response time to uncover the hidden biases that affect consumer preferences. If an association makes sense to a consumer (e.g. Mercedes & good) it will take him / her less time to categorise words or images referring to Mercedes (e.g. Class C, Mercedes logo…) in the same category as positive words (good, pleasant, joy…), compared with negative ones (e.g. bad, unpleasant, sad…). The technique can be used to compare two categories / brands (e.g. Mercedes vs Opel) or simply to measure implicit attitudes towards one product (see the ‘personlised IAT’), and is easily administered on a computer or over the Internet.
Posted by Marie Taillard - @marietaillard at 10:47 - 0 Comments
In the morning-after analyses following the 2012 US Presidential elections, most pundits agreed on one particular point that had gone very right for the Obama campaign and terribly wrong for the Romney campaign: their respective ability to gain real competitive advantage from the masses of voter data available to them. Both of the campaigns had bet heavily on being able to extract value from the thousands of available databases containing voters’ leanings on political and social issues, previous endorsements and donations, from sources ranging from social media to registration records to door-to-door canvassing reports. For the Democrats as well as the Republicans, data management was a key strategic focus, albeit a daunting one, as the potential of so-called Big Data as a game changer in gaining valuable insights into voter intentions and behaviour was well known to both candidates. IT professionals and analysts on both sides had been working for more than 18 months on ramping up their projects, which ironically shared one feature: they both bore the names of large cetaceans, Obama’s Narwhal and Romney’s Orca (the orca is the only predator that goes after narwhals). While interviews with Obama campaign staff and volunteers suggest how much they benefited from the Narwhal data in the months leading to the elections, the Orca team had to admit defeat early on election day when the system went bust and failed to deliver. The rest is...history.
Posted by Alkmini Gritzali at 14:25 - 0 Comments
In the modern marketing theory, all products are considered as services, co-created by the producer and the consumer (Prahalad & Ramaswamy, 2004; Vargo & Lusch, 2004). In some cases, such as the DIY or IKEA furniture, co-creation is literally the case, as consumers actually build themselves the final product. In some others, such as cars for example, this is less profound. In the case of Lego, however, co-creation takes a different direction. The reason why I think Lego is a distinct case is that the actual product the company sells (does not need introduction, but) is a number of different size, multi-coloured plastic bricks. The final Lego product, though, is possibly a brick construction, or many, unique for each Lego user, that can take thousands of forms and meanings. That is, the final Lego product depends on the user, the consumer, in order not to build according to the instructions (as in the IKEA case), but rather to build according to his/her imagination and personal creativity.
Posted by Luca M. Visconti at 10:17 - 0 Comments
Over the last decade street art creativity has entered various domains of consumer life, such as public space (e.g., the apartheid wall in Palestine, JR’s ‘Women are Heroes’ project in Brazilian favelas, etc.), museums (such as PAC in 2007, Tate Modern in 2008, and Centre Pompidou in 2011), art auctions (both off line and online), street wear (e.g., Adidas, Diesel and Puma), commercial communication (Ikea, Nokia, Porsche), and even luxury (e.g., Stephen Sprouse’s 2001 Graffiti collection, re-edited by fashion designer Marc Jacobs in 2009, for Louis Vuitton).
Posted by Tom van Laer - @tvanlaer at 10:48 - 0 Comments
In the past ten years, social media have revolutionized the way people communicate. Each day, 483 million users log on to Facebook. Each minute, 72 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube. Each second, 4050 tweets are “tweeted” out onto the Web, to a worldwide community. These numbers have been growing exponentially. Many businesses are now providing services in these and other social network sites.
Posted by Alkmini Gritzali at 11:27 - 0 Comments
There is no need to introduce once again the influence of social media in people’s lives and their importance for modern marketing. We all know that – due to this influence – the word ‘sharing’ has a new meaning nowadays, namely the sharing of online content. People share content every day: they forward articles to their friends, they email YouTube videos, they send film and restaurant reviews to each other. They retweet and share Facebook statuses and Instagram pictures. In all these cases, they share content about which they hold certain feelings – both love and hate. Most of the time, people share content they love or find particularly interesting, but we cannot ignore the much-hated content that has been shared from time to time.
Posted by Chris Halliburton - @challibu at 10:25 - 0 Comments
Some decades ago the original marketing guru Ted Levitt wrote a seminal article entitled “Marketing success through differentiation – of anything”. Since then differentiation is seen to be central to both strategy and to marketing – the key question is how to differentiate, as there are a myriad ways to do so. I would contend that creativity is at the heart of this question and that this applies to all businesses – do you agree?
Posted by Benjamin Voyer at 10:31 - 0 Comments
During my career as a marketing practitioner – and still these days as a marketing consultant – I have worked for very different types of companies and in different industries: Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCGs), public institutions, banks, commodity suppliers…
Posted by James Henry - @seamushenry at 9:37 - 0 Comments
Creativity Marketing might seem to be the most appropriate term to describe the more intriguing and clever marketing efforts of various companies, charities, institutions and just about any other organisation that engages in marketing. Time after time, we discover brilliant campaigns that work so well because of their creative simplicity. These examples however are often the result of intensive work by agencies or in-house marketing departments, but what if we could enlist the help of an existing consumer base to do the work for us? A consumer base whose numbers stretch into the hundreds of thousands, and one which is very capable and very smart, most having some form of third level education. This consumer base is so devoted to your brand that they are willing to spend nights and weekends acting as an extended branch of your R&D department, finding and suggesting improvements to your products that your best and most skilled employees may overlook.
Posted by Peter Stephenson-Wright at 10:42 - 0 Comments
The outcome of last week’s US Presidential election reminds us yet again of the power of an established brand – including a public personality - when it comes to influencing consumer decision-making. Barack Obama himself characterised the contest as “It's the devil you know versus the devil you don't.” The public went for the devil they knew. (Even if, as Edward Luce pointed out in the Financial Times, “The angel we didn’t know suited him so much better.”)
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