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Posted by Tom van Laer - @tvanlaer at 10:11 - 3 Comments
150 years ago, Uncle Tom’s Cabin of Harriet Beecher Stowe played an important role in galvanizing public opinion against slavery. That is a novel written by one individual. However, in the past 150 years, communication was mostly one-sided from the company to the customer. Today, the power of the narrative returns as consumers get to be part of the conversation. Marketing communication has become symmetric. Lots of Internet users update their profile pages on Facebook, Twitter, or other social media sites. Whether in the form of status updates or tweets, they share creatively written stories or photos and videos about themselves and their experiences and narratives have the power to change our beliefs.
Posted by Benjamin Voyer at 10:04 - 0 Comments
Launching new products is something very exciting for a marketing manager, but it can also be a daunting prospect, since the fear of failure can be very stressful. Indeed, many failed launches regularly make it to the classroom as ‘state of the art’ failures – Dasani Water in Europe, Bic Perfumes to cite only a few. One thing I have noticed is that most of these failed launches have in common a failure to educate customers to a new gesture. Offering innovative products with new benefits is not enough to guarantee market success. One requires a genuine ‘education’ to the new associated gestures. One industry that has extensively used education to new gestures is the cosmetics industry – even more so with the launch of cosmetics for men – think about it: how do you educate customers to go beyond after-shave products to a more complete care solution?
Posted by Peter Stephenson-Wright at 10:46 - 0 Comments
Mistakes are wrong, right? Well, no. A fundamental characteristic of Creativity Marketing is the drive to find new and unexplored solutions to problems. And that means taking risks and travelling into uncharted territories, living dangerously with the prospect of making mistakes. The problem is that traditional marketing organisations are not set up to tolerate mistakes, even less so to reward them. And yet, mistakes can actually add value to the company. How? Mistakes show the way not to go, they save the organisation from future mis-steps.
Posted by Vlad Glaveanu at 9:56 - 0 Comments
The age-old question of where creativity (or creation more generally) comes from and what it is has become something of a modern obsession. Pick up any newspaper, read any job application, any company’s mission statement or (if you fancy) any post on dating websites and there it is! Creativity is wanted, desired, required, shown, cultivated, etc.etc. But what IS IT actually? Nobody can tell. And this is because, just like many other abstract notions that we often use in daily life, the scientific definition becomes almost irrelevant. We operate with more or less overlapping ‘implicit’ definitions of creativity and, even for one and the same person, its meaning can change from one context to the next. In a sense this is creativity turning onto itself, constant re-creation and liberation from the constraints of science and its systems of classification.
Posted by Minas Kastanakis at 12:42 - 0 Comments
With the phenomenal expansion of (the crisis-resistant) luxury markets, certain issues - highly relevant for contemporary luxury brand managers - are in need of an effective and creative approach. In a recent article of mine, published as the lead paper in the Journal of Business Research (vol. 65, 10, p. 1399-1407), my co-author Prof. G. Balabanis and I, look into some of these consumer trends. Luxury brands try to leverage particular meanings and themes to fuel consumption. Academics, for example, usually argue that the true meaning of a luxury lies in its uniqueness, rarity, and the inability of the masses to obtain it. On the contrary, we see that managers (who are engaged in the day-to-day battles in luxury markets) are stretching the boundaries of access to luxury brands.
Posted by Alkmini Gritzali at 19:21 - 0 Comments
A collection of animated pictures made and published in Vahram Muratyan's blog has now become a book and a very popular YouTube video directed and edited by Tony Miotto. The whole project is based on the comparison between two of the most iconic cities of the world; Paris and New York. Vahram Muratyan, who a graphic designer, said: "It all started when I wondered, if I was stranded on a desert island, what aspects of Paris and New York would I keep? What would be the perfect collection of things? They could be habits, or landmarks or food, anything that would bring the two cultures together in one image."
Posted by Claûde Beaupré - @Beaupsy at 12:04 - 0 Comments
At least ten times a day, I find myself scrolling through my Twitter feed, anxiously looking for exciting new marketing ideas in my trusty list of my favourite publishers. The other day, I noticed that one such publisher has the ability to reel me in, nine times out of ten – Fast Company. After much analysis, it’s clear to me that Fast Company is providing attractive content about creativity, but they’re also doing it in a holistically creative way, which truly makes all the difference.
Posted by Benjamin Voyer at 10:24 - 1 Comments
When I decided to become an academic and seriously started thinking about doctoral studies, almost 10 years ago, I thought research was the most creative exercise one could do. After all, isn’t it about generating new knowledge, going beyond what is already known? Having spent some years in the marketing industry, where I felt my daily job as a marketer was sometimes very constrained, and not really creative after all, I thought I would find infinite creativity in academic research.
Posted by Tom van Laer - @tvanlaer at 10:00 - 0 Comments
A fancy term for persuasion by stories is narrative persuasion. The phenomenon of transportation, or mentally entering a narrative, plays a crucial role in narrative persuasion. Here's why. People find stories entertaining for two reasons. First, they imagine the events the main character experiences. Second, they feel for the character. In 1993, professor Richard Gerrig of Yale University published research in which he observed that people who find reading novels entertaining are changed by their reading experience, after they finish reading, such that readers who become engrossed in the story tend to accept the story as true, as well as the beliefs and behaviours that the characters exhibit as good. If people do not lose themselves in the story (meaning they are not transported), they respond negatively to the story or the characters and dismiss the narrative as nonsense.
Posted by Marie Taillard - @marietaillard at 9:59 - 0 Comments
A recent Marketing Week article covering our June Big Data and Creativity Conference features the case study of the Caravan Club and the issues it faces in dealing with the large quantities of data it generates. According to Tony Lewis, their Head of Member Marketing, they find it difficult to squeeze out the full value of the data collected from different sources. I really liked his comment that "not until you work out what shape to mould it into, does it take any shape and make sense."
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at 19/11/2012 11:50
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