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Posted by James Henry - @seamushenry at 9:37 - 0 Comments
Creativity Marketing might seem to be the most appropriate term to describe the more intriguing and clever marketing efforts of various companies, charities, institutions and just about any other organisation that engages in marketing. Time after time, we discover brilliant campaigns that work so well because of their creative simplicity. These examples however are often the result of intensive work by agencies or in-house marketing departments, but what if we could enlist the help of an existing consumer base to do the work for us? A consumer base whose numbers stretch into the hundreds of thousands, and one which is very capable and very smart, most having some form of third level education. This consumer base is so devoted to your brand that they are willing to spend nights and weekends acting as an extended branch of your R&D department, finding and suggesting improvements to your products that your best and most skilled employees may overlook.
Posted by Peter Stephenson-Wright at 10:42 - 0 Comments
The outcome of last week’s US Presidential election reminds us yet again of the power of an established brand – including a public personality - when it comes to influencing consumer decision-making. Barack Obama himself characterised the contest as “It's the devil you know versus the devil you don't.” The public went for the devil they knew. (Even if, as Edward Luce pointed out in the Financial Times, “The angel we didn’t know suited him so much better.”)
Posted by Benjamin Voyer at 10:00 - 3 Comments
Today, I want to discuss two common shortcuts people make when thinking of what makes a brand creative – and what doesn’t. When I ask students that question, the same names come back most of the time – Google, Samsung, or Apple. Often, people make judgements about creativity based on the industry companies belong to – technology being often seen as a shortcut for creativity. The problem with this kind of reasoning is that it treats creativity in absolute terms, rather than in relative ones. Let me explain. Creativity marketing is about being better at using creativity than the industry average. In addition, not all creative brands come from creative industries – for instance, Innocent can be seen as a very creative brand, although its industry – fruit juices – is not a very creative one. Creative inspirations can be found in any industry, not just the creative ones.
Posted by Alkmini Gritzali at 9:29 - 0 Comments
Burberry is a brand that needs no introduction. Founded in 1856 by Thomas Burberry, the British Heritage Label is now one of the most famous and profitable luxury retailers worldwide. The brand mostly sells its products to consumers through retail – including digital – having around 200 mainline stores, the same number of concessions within department stores, as well as digital commerce. According to the company’s website, Burberry “was named the fourth-fastest growing brand globally” in 2011/12 by Interbrand as well as WPP/BrandZ, following Apple, Google and Amazon. It has also been included in Interbrand’s “Top 100 Global Brands” for the past three years, and received the Luxury Briefing “Inspiring Luxury Loyalty” award.
Posted by Vishal Kapadia - @vishkap at 15:10 - 3 Comments
Having recently completed the Master in Marketing and Creativity at ESCP Europe, I have been exposed to many industries and marketing best (and worst) practices across many different companies. The models, frameworks and approaches of the programme are no doubt valuable for integrating marketing with strategy in many industries, ranging from hi-tech, to cultural and fashion-forward organisations.
Posted by Darren Oddie - @DarrenOddie at 9:57 - 6 Comments
IT, Finance and Business Intelligence are no longer the only users of large streams of data: Marketing departments are starting to leverage ‘big’ data more and more, often to drive creative outputs. AGILEci recently worked with a team of Marketing & Creativity postgraduate students at ESCP Europe to evaluate this trend and the relevance in achieving tangible results for marketers. We uncovered some very interesting insights, but before I plunge into the highlights, we have to put big data into the marketing context first by looking at what marketers are focused on and/or concerned about.
Posted by Tom van Laer - @tvanlaer at 10:13 - 7 Comments
Tom van Laer answers the question posed after his post of 17th October, 2012 Thank you, Abhijin, for this interesting question. Depending on your age and memory, developments in the modern marketing industry seem radically new or reassuringly old. To me the past five years have seemed like the former. I perceive a new deal: Whereas in the past 150 years, media have been pushed to people, today consumers get to be part of the conversation. Using a Facebook-inspired approach, I argue that companies can piggyback on social actions by online users, because people ultimately influence people.
Posted by Marie Taillard - @marietaillard at 9:22 - 1 Comments
In the age of social media, “conversation” has become a bit of a buzzword: we try to engage customers in “conversation,” we encourage our business partners to continue the “conversation,” we carry out conversations with total strangers on forums, tweetchats and other ephemeral platforms, our conversations take place 24/7, across continents on Skype, on our smartphones, sometimes verbally, sometimes manually, using texts, BBM, Whatsapp, Faceboook and more. The basic one-on-one, casual conversation has evolved into a multi-faceted, geographically dislocated, multi-media facilitated phenomenon.
Posted by Laurent François - @lilzeon at 9:35 - 0 Comments
If you’re familiar with advertising agencies’ way of life, you’ve already faced comprehensive guidelines, established by global brands. Specs are precise, and it’s still barely impossible to deny them. Even worse, if you don’t respect them, your client can depreciate your fees… But this ancient habit is more and more challenged by new rules. Brands as Innocent Drinks, which topped the 2012 Social Brands List, are progressively changing what guidelines are about.
Posted by Chris Halliburton - @challibu at 9:32 - 0 Comments
Last week’s ‘Marketing’ magazine featured a debate for and against the idea that the top creative marketing talent is to be found in London and that top brands have to pay a premium to lure marketers away from the capital. London is famous of course for its creative marketing talent as evidenced not only in marketing, brand, design & communication agencies, but more generally in the creative industries – theatre, film, fashion, music (e.g. 5 major orchestras compared to other cities), etc. The Saatchi brothers & many other famous admen and businessmen such as Martin Sorrell wrestled the advertising epicentre away from the ‘mad men’ of Madison Avenue in New York to London in the 1970’s and 1980s and arguably this then shifted to Paris and elsewhere in Europe?
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