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Posted by Benjamin Voyer at 12:45 - 2 Comments
When people see a brand as a creative one, they expect any of its moves (e.g. new product launch, TV ad, etc.) to be creative ones. On the one hand, this is highly positive, since having a reputation of being creative means having a lot of attention around one’s initiatives. But these expectations can also backfire. If you are not consistently perceived as being creative, then you disappoint! Even if you are still significantly better or more creative than the competition.
16/11/2012
Value as process
Posted by Vlad Glaveanu at 11:31 - 1 Comments
Questions about value and its emergence stand at the core of many disciplines across the social sciences and the humanities. This is how, today, we have philosophical reflections on value, we enjoy pragmatic definitions given by economists, structural approaches specific for sociology and subjectivist approaches typical for psychology, and even get to be annoyed by rhetorical takes on the notion employed in political discourses and mass-media communication. Value, it is claimed, is “produced”, it “exists”, can be “increased”, and sometimes (unfortunately) is “lost”. But who exactly are the actors of value creation, maintenance and loss and where exactly do we need to look to find value and measure it? These, it seems, are pressing questions for any student of marketing and consumer behaviour.
Posted by Benjamin Voyer at 10:00 - 3 Comments
Today, I want to discuss two common shortcuts people make when thinking of what makes a brand creative – and what doesn’t. When I ask students that question, the same names come back most of the time – Google, Samsung, or Apple. Often, people make judgements about creativity based on the industry companies belong to – technology being often seen as a shortcut for creativity. The problem with this kind of reasoning is that it treats creativity in absolute terms, rather than in relative ones. Let me explain. Creativity marketing is about being better at using creativity than the industry average. In addition, not all creative brands come from creative industries – for instance, Innocent can be seen as a very creative brand, although its industry – fruit juices – is not a very creative one. Creative inspirations can be found in any industry, not just the creative ones.
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